CONSTITUTION DAY

TL 9-17 CONSTITUTION DAY

9-17 THE CONSTITUTION QUILT
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I am quick to admit that I take the liberties given me by this document for granted! I was born and raised in the United States of America, so I have known freedom and liberty my whole life. Nowadays, all I hear about is how much our liberties under the Constitution are shrinking away and dwindling. It’s a scary thought to me. I like freedom of religion, freedom to bear arms and freedom of speech! I like that I can voice an opinion on my blog without fear of punishment by the government (well, so far, so good).

I’m thankful to God that I have freedom today and want to be assured of my freedom tomorrow.

As I often do, I turned to my group on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/groups/asecondhelpingofwellness) for advice. My friend, Valerie McKinney offered “The Constitution Quilt” analogy. I thought it was brilliant and asked if I could borrow the concept and use her quote because it really touched my heart. She was so gracious to give me permission, so please read this great quote:

It seems all the guidelines of the Constitution are becoming a tattered quilt, worn through and full of holes in which the bureaucrats pay no tailor to mend, but line their own pockets. The holes remain as the citizens of America fall far from the warmth of the comforts and care the Constitution provided its original inhabitants. Barely threads to cover a veteran who has fought to keep these principle freedoms pressed and blocked. They say times are different now. Things have changed now… and our Homeland is an unhappy lot. Then, does this not tell us something about mending the construction of the Constitution? Repair and replace the pattern of words that held our nation close knit and decorating our days with tried and trusted values and liberties. Protection against a cold cruel future that needs to wrap us in its security. Mend THE CONSTITUTIONAL QUILT. No holes should it have, but let it with pride sew its bright patterns for the future and set its seams straight. – Valerie McKinney

The Constitution of the United States has a purpose. It’s not just a piece of paper with meaningless words on it. We the people, in order to form a more PERFECT UNION… the first words explain why the document is necessary. A perfect union with all men seen as equal and the pursuit of happiness a right for all citizens of the United States.

When leaders choose to overlook the Constitution of the United States and there are no consequences for those actions, they will continue to walk all over it, causing more worn spots in the quilt. If we the people do not demand that our leaders follow the mandates in this document, we are the ones who will ultimately pay. Why do we not get that?

If we ignore the slow, but sure disintegration of this key document, we lose freedoms. My freedoms are precious to me. Aren’t your freedoms precious to you, too? Exercise your right to vote in the upcoming election and vote for FREEDOM. I know I will. ūüôā

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CALIFORNIA ADMISSION DAY

TL 9-9 CALIFORNIA ADMISSION DAY

This movie took place in 1900 when the iron horse was the mode of transportation from East to West.¬† But in the mid 1800’s it was one rough ride to get out west.

CALIFORNIA ADMISSION DAY is a legal holiday in the state of California.¬†¬†California’s admission¬†into the Union as the thirty-first state back in 1850 is being celebrated today.¬† As part of the Compromise of 1850 California was admitted to the Union as a free state after being ceded to the United States by Mexico at the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848.

You can fall in love at first sight with a place as with a person.  РAlec Waugh

The state of California offers any type of scenery you might like – from ocean to forest to skyscrapers in cities.¬† In the 1800’s there was a different reason for folks to take a wagon train headed west – GOLD.¬† Back then it wasn’t as simple as hopping in the station wagon and driving along highways.¬† It was a very rough ride in a covered wagon instead.¬† Some people did not survive the trip, as disease and weather conditions sometimes took lives.

If you want to get a good idea of what it was like to travel in a covered wagon along the Oregon Trail, there are excerpts from Margaret Frink’s diary online.¬† She was born in 1818 and married her husband in 1839.¬† They decided to head west to California in 1850.¬† They settled in Sacramento but lived in several parts of California.

http://www.oregontrailcenter.org/HistoricalTrails/JournalEntries/frink.htm

Of course there are several movies depicting the travels in the 1800’s out west.¬† We consider those folks pioneers and know their lives were not easy, but they hung on to hope and dreamed of a better life.¬† I admire those who hold on to hope and forge ahead regardless of the risk.¬† They kept their wits about them and held on to faith in God.

To dare is to lose one‚Äôs footing momentarily. To not dare is to lose oneself.¬† – S√łren Kierkegaard

Along the way there was surely pain, suffering and loss.  Wives buried husbands, parents buried children.

Today we see forgetting the curling iron on a trip as devastating.  Really???  :-/