NATIONAL ROTISSERIE CHICKEN DAY

TL 6-2 NATIONAL ROTISSERIE CHICKEN DAY

EATING CHICKEN

Ugh – liver IS the worst – AMEN to that!  😉

We can hardly imagine a restaurant that does not have rotisserie chicken turning before our eyes!  A rotisserie uses indirect heat in which the chicken is placed next to the heat source.  Elements are either electric or gas-powered, with adjustable infrared heat.  These types of rotisseries are quite functional for cooking rotisserie-style chicken.  It’s perfect for a restaurant that serves so many people every day!

It’s wise in its simplicity really – because any leftover chicken can be used for sandwiches, chicken salad, soup or any number of other dishes.

Here in the states, rotisserie chicken gained popularity in the 2000’s.  Not only did restaurants start offering the dish, but many grocery stores and even Walmart sold them.  Millions of rotisserie-cooked chickens were purchased by consumers in the U.S. last year. 

Protein is a key nutrient that supplies your body with energy and keeps your muscles and cells healthy. Three ounces of rotisserie breast meat supplies 23.8 grams of protein, which is 52 percent of the 46 grams of protein that women need each day and 43 percent of the 56 grams that men require on a daily basis. A rotisserie thigh contains 22.9 grams of protein.  For type 2 diabetics, this is good news!  Just make sure you weigh that piece of chicken so you keep portion control in mind.  😉  And…  in our house the skin is removed – sorry, but that skin is just unnecessary fat.

People who suffer with migraine headaches should be aware that chickens used for rotisserie cooking may be injected with water or a solution of sodium to retain moisture and add flavor.  The water is not bad, but the addition of sodium can trigger migraine headaches.  Some other ingredients may be used to enhance flavor and brown the chicken, such as oleoresin, yeast extract, sodium tripolyphosphate and natural flavorings.  Yeah, some of these additives trigger migraines as well.  Be careful when you’re choosing a chicken.

Since there’s literally no way to tell what has been injected into a rotisserie-cooked chicken, my husband and I decided to buy a Showtime rotisserie for our home.  We put as little or as much seasoning on our chicken as we like.  There’s more than one way to cook a chicken!  It’s just one more way to take control of my surroundings and stay healthy.

https://www.ronco.com/

We usually inject a little water into the chicken and sprinkle some Mrs. Dash seasoning on it before cooking.  The natural juices and no sodium seasoning make the chicken taste amazing – and no ugly migraine side effect – YAY!  So, eat some rotisserie chicken today!  🙂

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NATIONAL CHICKEN CORDON BLEU DAY

TL 4-4 NATIONAL CHICKEN CORDON BLEU DAY

As you have undoubtedly noticed, I enjoy the “foodie” holidays!  If I was at a healthy weight, I could enjoy these days with wild abandon…  however, I have to put on the brakes when it comes to making the high-fat, high-carbohydrate versions of these dishes.  Fortunately, I’m usually able to do a little research and come up with a recipe even I can make without feeling guilty!

Here is a healthy recipe that takes hundreds of calories, fat grams and sodium milligrams out – but has all the great flavor of the original.  It goes from over 700 calories to under 300.  The original recipe has nearly 50g of fat!  Our recipe has just 10g of fat.  And instead of a whopping 850mg of sodium, we’ll have just 500mg.

Prep time – 30 min.

Makes 6 servings

CHICKEN CORDON BLEU

6 boneless skinless chicken breast halves (4 oz. each)

1/4 tsp. salt

1/4 tsp. pepper

6 slices deli ham

3 slices aged Swiss cheese, halved

1 cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs)

Cooking spray

sauce

2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour

1 cup 2% milk

1/2 cup dry white wine

1/3 cup finely shredded Swiss cheese

1/4 tsp. salt

1/8 tsp. pepper

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper; arrange in a greased 9×13″ baking dish.
  2. Top each with 1 slice ham and 1/2 slice cheese, folding ham in half and covering chicken as much as possible.  Sprinkle with bread crumbs.  Carefully spritz crumbs with cooking spray, keeping crumbs in place.  Bake 15-20 minutes or until golden brown and a thermometer inserted in chicken reads 165 degrees.
  3. For sauce, in a small saucepan, whisk flour and milk until smooth.  Bring sauce to a boil, stirring constantly; cook and stir 1-2 minutes or until thickened.
  4. Reduce to medium heat.  Stir in wine and shredded cheese; cook and stir 2-3 minutes or until cheese is melted and sauce is thickened and bubbly.  Stir in salt and pepper.  Keep warm over low heat until ready to serve.  Serve sauce with chicken.

Per serving:

285 calories, 9g fat (4g sat. fat), 89mg chol., 490mg sodium, 12g. carb, trace fiber, 33g pro.

Diabetic Exchanges:

4 lean meat, 1 starch

I hope this encourages you to celebrate around the dinner table with your family tonight!  🙂

FOOD DAY

TL 10-24 FOOD DAY

10-24 FAVORITE FOODS

Most holidays are centered around food – let’s admit it.  Birthdays and anniversaries are not complete without cake and ice cream.  We all have our favorite foods at Thanksgiving and Christmas.  Today is different – we celebrate food itself!

Diabetes has taught me to look at food choices differently than I used to.  I used to eat more carbohydrates and unhealthy fats.  Now I have restricted both in order to keep my blood glucose happy and lose some weight.  Good fuel equals good overall health and a good mood!  Healthy foods are not more expensive or less tasty than unhealthy foods.

The only drawback of fresh fruits and vegetables is that they need to be used rather quickly after being purchased.  You do have to visit the market more often, but the benefits far outweigh the drawbacks.  Once you begin to enjoy meals with fresh or frozen foods, you won’t want to eat packaged, canned or overly processed foods again.

I refer to junk food as “party food” because the only time I allow myself to eat it is in a social situation.  There was a time when I took a bag of chips with me to watch television and mindlessly popped them – then wondered why I gained so much weight!  Now that I’ve been forced to think about what I eat, it’s easier now.  I have to think of food as fuel for my body and not comfort for my emotions.  It’s amazing how freeing it is once you separate the two.

People tend to buy processed packaged foods for the convenience factor.  Open, heat and eat.  I challenge you to read the labels of the convenience foods next time you’re at the grocery store.  Before I had to think about eating, I bought the instant packets of oatmeal.  I didn’t read the labels because I didn’t think I needed to.  Once I did start reading them – I was shocked at the amount of sodium and sugar in those tiny little packets!  Now I buy steel-cut oatmeal with no added sugars or sodium.  What a difference that one change made!

Fresh food does demand more preparation – (chopping, dicing, etc.) but in the long run, it is well worth the effort.  Celebrate real food today!  😀