ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY 2

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On this day in 1974, the fight known around the world as RUMBLE IN THE JUNGLE took place in Kinshasa, Zaire.  Muhammad Ali regained the heavyweight title by knocking out George Foreman in the eighth round.

The event was one of Don King’s first ventures as a professional boxing promoter.  It was the most publicized fight of all time.  When Ali was finally reinstated it was just a matter of time before the two would fight.

Here’s how it went:  Foreman went right at Ali in the first round.  Ali kept saying, “hit harder” in true Ali style as he danced around the ring.  He was quite the showman with the dancing and taunting.  At one point Ali even shouted, “They told me you could PUNCH, George!”

Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee – his hands can’t hit what his eyes can’t see.  – Muhammad Ali

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After Ali’s victory, the words “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee” became part of our culture.  I remember hearing the kids at school say it often.

I have fond memories of the Gillette Friday Night Fights on television.  Not because of the bouts – oh no way – but because I got to spend time with my daddy.  He never missed those fights – and as odd as it may sound, it was my chance to just sit and color in my coloring book or something.  I remember my dad punching his bare fists in the air saying, “get ‘im…  get ‘im!”  He got a little involved when it came to the fights.  He got red in the face as he punched the air…  it was so funny.  I was more entertained watching my daddy than watching the fight.

Back then our television sets were all black and white, so there was always one boxer wearing white trunks and the other wearing black ones.  That’s good – if they had not done that, we’d get confused – lol.

Boxing was my field mission, the first part of my life.  – Muhammad Ali

Both Ali and Foreman received five million dollars for that fight!  Then of course, George Foreman went on to invent the greatest indoor grill ever!  Now why couldn’t I have invented the greatest indoor grill ever???  I need the money – I doubt that he did.  Sigh.  Oh well.

Muhammad amazed me, I’ll admit it.  He out-thought me, he out-fought me.  That night, he was just the better man in the ring.  – George Foreman

I was reading a short story about two brothers who were learning to box and decided to fight each other.  The author of the story said that their bout lasted about 4 minutes!  He didn’t say 4 rounds, but 4 minutes!  His point was, it seemed like forever – so can you imagine how long it must have seemed to Ali and Foreman to go 8 rounds?  You might say…  those two went the distance!

Sometimes in our lives as Christians it seems like we go the distance.  Temptations are all around us, but as this wonderful poem by Lucinda reminds us…  our God is willing and able to help us when we’re fighting with ol’ split-hoof in the ring.  More to the point…  He does our fighting for us if we’ll just ask Him to.

going-the-distanceWe’re not perfect people, but we serve a perfect God and He loves us so much and He’s with us to help us overcome the evil one.  We can’t fight the devil on our own.  Our coach, Christ Jesus – He will fight with us and for us.  ❤

If you have a special memory about the Gillette Friday Night Fights or this particular fight, please leave a comment for me!  Sometimes it’s just fun to take a little trip down memory lane, isn’t it?  🙂

 

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ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY (2)

Here’s John Coyote singing one of my favorite Elvis songs – “Don’t”. 

Let’s begin today’s post with a trivia question:  In which film did Elvis Presley wear a beard?

Yes…  I said a BEARD.  Do you know the answer?  Not to worry – I didn’t know which one it was either.

On this day in 1968, Elvis began filming the movie CHARRO!  It was a bust – Elvis had a beard and only one of his songs was used in the film.  It was an all-around bummer.

Of course to die-hard Elvis fans (like me), anything he did was quite alright.  Beard, no beard – whatever.  He had music in his voice and I could listen to him sing forever.  His presence on the big screen was mesmerizing.

Although 1968 seems like a very long time ago, sometimes it seems like yesterday.  I used to hear my grandparents talk about how when they were young those were simpler, more innocent days.  I didn’t know what they meant at the time they were telling me that, but now – well, I would say that 1968 was a simpler, more innocent time than 2016.

In 1968 I was 9 years old.  It was a pre-computer age and our telephones were all landlines.  There were not many “R” rated movies showing at the theater, and we had another Elvis movie to look forward to.

Elvis played Jess Wade, a man falsely accused of having stolen a cannon from the Mexican revolutionary forces.  He tries to find the real culprits, a gang of criminals.

There were no F bombs and no scenes that were uncomfortable to watch in mixed company.  I miss simplicity and innocence in films.  No, this wasn’t his best movie, but I’d still rather watch it than some of the junk that they try to pass off as entertainment these days.

By 1968, Elvis had made 28 movies – and they were all starting to run together and the plots were beginning to seem very familiar.  It seemed to be a matter of what environment they decided to put Elvis in.  By the time movie number 29 was being filmed, they apparently thought the only thing they could do to change the routine of the plot was have Elvis grow a five-day shadow.

Real fans didn’t mind the familiarity of the plot – but even we were predicting with a fair degree of accuracy the twists and turns of the movies once there were so many of them.  I head Elvis say in an interview that he wished he had spent less time working on movies and more time working on new music.  He was a great talent to be sure and could obviously do either one – and whether you think anything he did was cheesy or not, I think it’s great that he left these gifts for us to enjoy.  🙂

 

 

 

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

905bb6eff125ed45baec0cf0ac4e97bc_six_columnOn this day in 2007, the 8th PIXAR film, RATATOUILLE was released by Walt Disney Pictures.  As I think back, it’s the last movie I went to see in a theatre.  I thoroughly enjoyed it because it was completely void of social or political “agenda”.  Few films, including Disney / Pixar releases of late, can say that.  I’m tired of movies, even the ones for kids, pushing a particular leftist agenda off on the youth.  I just want to be entertained – that is ALL.  That’s my agenda…  and it’s the agenda of many others, including Lucinda Berry Hill.  ❤MY AGENDA

Ratatouille was directed by Brad Bird, who took over from Jan Pinkava in 2005.

I’ll be honest, I didn’t know that ratatouille was a French dish – or that the main character in the film would be…  a rat.  It was so cute and cleaver!  RATatouille – and Remy is a RAT.  Who thinks of this stuff?

I’ll do my best not to spoil the ending for you – but basically, Remy the rat has a goal to become a chef.  He goes about achieving this dream by making friends with a Parisian restaurant’s garbage boy.  I can’t remember his name – hey, it was 2007, give me a break.  Anyway…  Ratatouille was released on June 29, 2007 in the United States and enjoyed box office success!  It also won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, among other honors.

Will Remy realize his lifelong dream of becoming a renowned French chef???  Why would I spoil the ending for you?  I know – most of you have probably seen it.  If you have small children you may have seen it more than once and less than a hundred times.  I don’t like everything Disney does (okay, don’t smack me) – but this is one movie that gets two thumbs up – really high – from me.

Have you made ratatouille?  There are a bunch of ingredients, but it’s so worth the expense and the time because it tastes so good and is so healthy.  I found the link for Disney’s recipe – did not know there was a recipe from the movie – but here it is!

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/222006/disneys-ratatouille/

I’m thankful for the odd movie that is just cute and fun for everyone without political correctness injected or obvious agenda pushing parts.  Are those days over?  I hope not.  I’m looking forward to the next really good movie from Disney and Pixar.  🙂

 

 

 

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

TL 5-20 ON THIS DAY IN HISTORYDo you own a pair of Levi’s???  Today’s a day to celebrate, because on this day in 1873, Levi Strauss and Jacob Davis got a patent for blue jeans!  I have to wonder if they know what they started…  sigh.

As early as 1918 the company created “Freedom-Alls,” a one-piece garment much like overalls, whose name echoed the sentiments of WW I.  By the 1920’s, LS&Co. was promoting women’s hiking togs and jackets in khaki, but not in blue denim.

I’m like every other woman: a closet full of clothes, but nothing to wear — so I wear jeans.  – Cameron Diaz

Did women wear jeans in the 1800’s?  Oh certainly NOT!  If they needed to wear jeans to do chores on the farm, they wore a pair of their brother’s britches.  Jeans were originally meant for men only and women wore dresses exclusively.  It was not until 1934 that Levi Strauss & Co. took a risk that forever altered the course of women’s fashion.

I’m not sure exactly what makes cats purr, but a really comfortable pair of blue jeans, a too-big piece of silky milk chocolate, and a good massage always do the trick for me.         – Terri Guillemets, “Purr, purr, purr,” 1993

Eighty-two years ago, in the fall of 1934, the company introduced the world’s first jeans made just for women.  Lady Levi’s jeans were first made for western women who needed jeans for farm or ranch work.  The new line was also aimed at women vacationing at dude ranches, working cattle or horse ranches that welcomed guests from eastern states or as far away as Europe.

Nothing is more alluring to a man than a woman who looks good in her jeans.  – Nina Garcia

By 1935 a dude ranching article appeared in Vogue magazine that featured the new Lady Levi’s line.  Thanks to Lady Levi’s sales at select stores in New York for “dudines” traveling west, jeans became fashionable for ladies in the eastern U.S.

Jean styles have seen interesting changes through the years.  Images courtesy of Getty:1736412-980x

On the farm in the 1910’s…  big and roomy so you can move freely, dungarees were practical for the farm.

MTM1OTc5MTEyNjExNTYzNTMwFor those in the movies or visiting a ranch, no outfit was complete without the boots, belt and hat.  You also had to get that perfect western style shirt.Lady-Levis-1934

Here’s those 1934 Lady Levi’s.  Casual and so stylish, all rolled up like that.

1940s-women-pants-denim-jeans-400x312In the 1940’s this is the look that got wolf whistles…  I know, I don’t get it either, but…

Jeans represent democracy in fashion.  – Giorgio Armani

1940s-jeans-boys-teenagers-300x337Guys wore jeans in the 1940’s too.

1950s-teens-daddle-loafer-shoes-pants1-361x500In the 1950’s there were poodle skirts…  and baggy jeans that were really rolled up – and the saddle oxford shoes, of course.f4f313f61b1991c44a7eb7933e3dcf00

In the 1960’s everything was skin tight and short…  everyone wanted to look like Twiggy!  And our jeans were not always blue.  We also wore the name of our jeans on our butts – yeah – that was fun.  The jeans that fit me the best were CHIC.  I never could fit into a pair of Levi’s because I was too short and…  well – anyway…  I found a brand that accentuated the positive – let’s just leave it at that.  😉1970s-bell-bottom-menswear-trend-580x822

And the 1970’s…  bell bottoms, anyone???  I always thought those his/hers matchy matchy outfits were a little…  well – weird.  Did anyone actually do that?  Nobody I knew did – but that doesn’t mean anything.jnco1 (2)

Beyond bell bottom jeans… things got weird somewhere along the way…  really, really weird.  That’s all I’m sayin’…mom_jeans_0

These are mom jeans…  from the 1980’s. These are what we don’t want to be caught dead in today.  Cuffs were rolled or not rolled and some of the shirt sleeves are even rolled.  And the waist bands sat at your natural waist, which means that if you bend over, all your “stuff” and your tattoo doesn’t show.  Wow, that’s a crying shame…  not.

In the 1980s, American brands from Levi’s to Gloria Vanderbilt, Jordache and Calvin Klein offered “designer” stretch jeans for women. The stretch jeans of this era were typically a dark wash, skinny and tight-fitting, and featured distinctive designs on the back pockets to identify the designer. The advertising campaigns for these status symbol jeans were unreservedly sexy, focusing on the denim style’s body conscious fit. If you were around during the 80s, you’ll remember a 15-year-old Brooke Shields from her controversial Calvin Klein Jeans TV ad, in which she unshyly told the camera, “Nothing comes between me and my Calvins.”    hilary-haylie-duff-low-rise-flare-jeans

And in the 1990’s the waistbands are SOOOOOOOOO LOW – and the bottoms were flared (but not bell bottom) – and long – too long – and always frayed because they were stepped on while walking – and they had to look tattered and worn – holes were put in them and they were beat with rocks and such – for the sake of fashion.  This is when I decided there are not jeans for my body type.  Oh – I miss my mom jeans.Skinny_jeans_street

Saying yes to the skinny jeans by saying no to the donuts.  – Betsy Cañas Garmon, www.wildthymecreative.com (2009 tweet, @wildthyme)

And here we are in the 2000’s.  How skinny can you get???  If you’re not skinny, you can’t wear jeans.  Trust me, I do say NO to the donuts, but it doesn’t seem to be enough to make me skinny – shoot!

I’m thankful for my sweat pants, yoga pants (and no, I do not do yoga), casual skirts and knit capris.  The jeans they make these days are not for me, but that’s okay.  I have good memories of younger days when I looked good in my CHIC jeans.  😉

 

 

 

 

 

 

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

TL 4-1 ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

On April 1, 1970, President Richard Nixon signed legislation that officially banned cigarette ads on TV and radio.

That’s particularly interesting because Nixon himself smoked a pipe.  I have to wonder if the legislation was enforced as part of the lobbyist groups or intense pressure from public health advocates.

Have the number of cigarette smokers declined since the ads went away?  I could not find any evidence that it has.  Today we fight the e-cigarette battle, which is arguably a more serious problem.

It was brought to light that there’s a link between cigarette smoking and terminal cancer, heart disease and a shortened life span as early as 1939!  By the late 1950’s there were laws in place prohibiting the sale of cigarettes to minors.  In 1964, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) agreed that advertisers should warn the public of the health hazards of smoking.  The surgeon general of the U.S. released an official report that linked cigarette smoking to low birth weight in 1969.  Eventually, Congress yielded to pressure from the public health sector and signed the Cigarette Smoking Act, which required manufacturers of cigarettes to place warning labels on their products.  Those labels are all too familiar to us today – they say “Cigarette Smoking May be Hazardous to Your Health”.

I was born in 1961, so I remember the cigarette ads on television.  They made smoking look so cool – and if you smoked, it made you tough.  I remember the Marlboro man, the Camel, the liberated women who smoked Virginia Slims, and Lucky Strike.  Tobacco companies took up most of the air space on television in 1969.  I was a kid, and yeah, I paid attention!

Public health officials and consumers wanted stronger warning labels on tobacco products and the ads banned from TV and radio.  Of course, the cigarette manufacturers defended the industry and their right to advertise, but there was growing evidence that nicotine was addictive and cigarette smoking caused cancer.

In 1962, Kennedy became the first president to sponsor studies on smoking and public health.

As we know, the tobacco companies lost the regulatory battle over TV and radio.  The last televised cigarette ad ran at 11:50 p.m. during The Johnny Carson Show on January 1, 1971.

https://youtu.be/htktQhVrZT4

Did you see that?  You have choices – you can have complete control.  Yeah, right! 

Several presidents enjoyed smoking.  In fact, Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Madison and Jackson owned tobacco plantations and used it in the form of snuff or smoked cigars.

Other Presidential cigarette smokers include Taft, Harding, Franklin Roosevelt, Hoover and Eisenhower.  Adams, Coolidge, Nixon and Ford smoked pipes.  I was surprised to learn that even Carter engaged in the time-honored after-dinner cigar-smoking ritual at many state functions.  Presidents Grant, Teddy Roosevelt and Clinton (Bill, not Hil) also smoked the cigar after dinner.

In the early 1970’s, I was listening to a song written and sung by Gary S. Paxton called “There Goes a Cigar Smoking a Man”.  Yeah, I’m really old – I’m tellin’ ya!

https://youtu.be/Fz1ASD9XCQY

Kennedy enjoyed cigars and had his press secretary buy as many Cuban cigars as possible before he strengthened a trade embargo against Cuba in 1961.

McKinley preferred to chew his tobacco, as did Taylor.  Spittoons were strategically placed throughout the White House during his tenure.  He claimed he could hit his mark from 12 feet!

Lest we leave the first ladies out, some of them used snuff, as smoking was considered most unladylike until well into the 20th century.  Dolley Madison, Rachel Jackson and Margaret Taylor all used snuff.  Eleanor Roosevelt, Mamie Eisenhower, Jackie Kennedy, Betty Ford, Nancy Reagan and Laura Bush all smoked cigarettes at one time, but had quit by the time their husbands became president.

In 1978, after Willie Nelson performed for President Carter, it’s said he snuck up to the roof and smoked what he called a big fat Austin torpedo – which is marijuana.

I know it’s April Fool’s Day, but this ain’t no joke!

“Willie Weed,” from the newly formed company Willie’s Reserve, will hit dispensary shelves in Colorado and Washington, where legalization of recreational marijuana has created a booming industry, the Associated Press reports. Nelson said he would partner with growers in both states.

So…  did it help to take the ads off TV and radio?  Well, do we need to put more anti-marijuana PSA’s on TV and radio instead???   That surely wouldn’t do any good in Colorado or Washington now, would it?

You know, if a person is stoned out of their mind and gets behind the wheel to drive, what are the chances that they will get where they’re going without severely injuring or killing another driver???  It will be interesting to see if the statistics increase.  God help the folks in Colorado and Washington.  Party on.  I guess maybe Willie will make enough money to pay his taxes – or maybe he’ll be too danged stoned to realize he missed the tax deadline.  It literally makes me sick to hear that man sing a gospel song.  Imagine how God must feel.  Shame on Willie Nelson – selling pot to line his pockets.  This surely won’t end well.  Jus’ sayin’…  😦

 

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

TL ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY (5)

 

7-23 LET'S EXAMINE HISTORY

The night is almost gone, and the day is near.  Therefore let us lay aside the deeds of darkness and put on the armor of light.  – Romans 13:2

On this day in 1967, one of the worst riots in U.S. history broke out on 12th Street in the heart of Detroit’s predominantly African-American inner city.  It began in the early morning hours and lasted four days.

It was only stopped after 7,000 National Guard and U.S. Army troops were involved.  The death toll came to 43 and 342 were injured.  Nearly 1,400 buildings were burned.  The 12th Street Riot was the worst U.S. riot in 100 years, occurring during a period of numerous riots in America.

The National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, appointed by President Johnson, identified more than 150 riots or major disorders between 1965 and 1968.  In 1967 alone, 83 people died and 1,800 were injured.  Property valued at more than $100 million was damaged, looted, or destroyed.

America, we must study our history, not so we can repeat it, but so we can find a better way of solving problems.  Rioting, senseless death, injuries, destruction is not the way to solve problems.  Let’s look at the late 1960’s and see how that ended.  Do we really want the 2000’s to be a carbon copy?  Have we not learned anything from our sad history?

God’s way is to pray and obey.  If we look at God’s Word, we see that we are to lean fully on Him for guidance and be obedient to His Word.  Nowhere in the Bible does it condone violence or rioting, destruction and hate.

When will we learn that drawing racial lines and causing division are methods that get us nowhere?  It accomplishes exactly nothing and leaves people dead in the streets!  What about that is right?  God cries at these times.

I cry too when I see the division is evident once again.  As a child of the 1960’s, it’s apparent to me that history is beginning to repeat itself, and it makes my heart sink.  Let’s come together and pray for America because frankly, with God’s help, we can be better than that!  Now that we’ve examined what happened in the 1960’s.  Let’s not allow history to repeat itself.  🙂

 

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY 7 2

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To this day, Elvis Presley is probably the most iconic figure in American music history.  From his truck driver hair style to his blue suede shoes, he took America by storm in 1954 and remained popular until his untimely death in 1977.

Every generation enjoyed his music.  Older people liked him because of his southern charm and good manners.  The fact that he recorded 4 gospel LP’s during his lifetime endeared him to the more conservative folks as well.  Younger people liked him because he seemed to understand them.  There was a little bit of rebel there that made us dig him.  His music had an appeal that spanned generations.

There’s not a baby boomer that does not have a favorite “Elvis” song.  Mine is “Don’t Be Cruel” and I’ll tell you why…

There’s a line in the song that says, “Then you’ll know you have me, and I’ll know then that I have you.”  Well, here’s how I sang it – “Then you’ll know you have me, and I’ll know LINDA I’ll have you.”

Hey – that’s what it sounded like he was saying!  It sounded like he was singing to ME!  How dreamy is that?

That great song was recorded on this day in 1956!  He also recorded “Hound Dog” on this day.  Both songs were hits – but by 1956, that came as no surprise to anyone.  There was just something about Elvis – he was driven when it came to music.

Over his two-decade career, Elvis recorded over 700 songs for the RCA label.  It’s thought, however, that there were other songs that never got recorded – which means that he probably knew and performed almost 1,000 songs!

I’ve been in a recording studio twice and recorded about 20 songs.  It was challenging to remember the chord progressions and lyrics to them.  I can’t even imagine what it takes to file 1,000 songs away in your mind.  I believe that’s just how much music meant to him.  There are some people who eat, drink and live music.  Elvis is definitely in that category.   There are Elvis impersonators on every corner, but there will only be one Elvis.  🙂