ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY
DIABETES

I have a new equation to share with you.  I = J K L.  It means INSULIN = JUST KEEP LIVING!!!

On this day in 1922, insulin was first used to treat Type 1 diabetes.  The patient was Leonard Thompson, age 14, of Canada.  He received the injection in the hospital at Toronto, Ontario.  The only known treatment for Type 1 diabetes at that time was a starvation diet, so Leonard was a mere 65 pounds when he was admitted and was drifting in and out of a coma.  He was at the end stages of Type 1 diabetes.

The injection he received apparently contained an impurity which was the likely cause for the allergic reaction he displayed.  A second dosage was given to the young patient twelve days after the first with no allergic reaction.  With the first injection, Thompson’s blood sugar levels dropped dramatically. Soon, he was rapidly regaining strength and appetite. Thompson recovered and was discharged from the hospital in May 1922.  Thompson’s health improved and he went on to live 13 more years taking doses of insulin.  He died of pneumonia at age 27.

Until insulin was made clinically available, a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes was an invariable death sentence, more or less quickly (usually within months, and frequently within weeks or days).  Until insulin was made clinically available, a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes was an invariable death sentence, more or less quickly (usually within months, and frequently within weeks or days).

Insulin is not a cure for Type 1 diabetes, but it is a vital part of treating it.  Some Type 2 diabetics are insulin dependent as well (I am one of them).  

Physical ills are the taxes laid upon this wretched life; some are taxed higher, and some lower, but all pay something.   – Lord Chesterfield

Insulin was discovered by Frederick Banting, a young surgeon from London, Ontario. During the fall of 1920, Dr. Banting became fascinated by studies on the role of the pancreas in regulating the metabolism of sugar and carbohydrates.

The discovery of insulin opened the door for a slew of life-saving drugs that continue to improve and save the lives of people around the world.

It (insulin) was a remarkable discovery and probably one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th century.  It resulted in Canada’s first Nobel Prize to (Frederick) Banting and (John) Macleod.  – Dr. Bernard Zinman

There is some hope around the corner for Type 2 diabetics today.  There is now an oral insulin delivery system which means no more shots for us!  Of course we are not aware of the cost of this little miracle.  For now, I’m still taking shots of Levemir every night.

Of course it is the HOPE of diabetics everywhere that there be a CURE!  That is what we all pray for every day!  🙂

 

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