WORLD UKELELE DAY

TL 2-2 WORLD UKULELE DAY

2-2 THERE'S NOTHING LIKE A UKEToday is WORLD UKULELE DAY!!!  Like many of my generation, I think of the great Tiny Tim when I think of a ukulele.  It’s so wrong when a man can sing two octaves above where I can…  anyway…

You can change the world by playing your ukulele and teaching others to play.  How about learning “You’ve Got a Friend in Me”???  Grab your uke and let’s learn!

When I was very young in the mid 1960’s, an older lady in our church played the ukulele and shared special music once in a while.  Have you ever heard a gospel song played on a ukulele?  It leaves a lasting impression, that’s for sure.  Actually, when she played “In the Garden” or “Pass Me Not, O Gentle Savior” it really was quite beautiful.  Sometimes the simple and familiar hymns are what God’s Holy Spirit can speak through best.  I remember saying the words in my mind as she played the tune.

A painter paints pictures on canvas. But musicians paint their pictures on silence.  – Leopold Stokowski

The little mini-guitar became a symbol for the folks in Hawaii.  It was introduced there in 1879 by a group of Portuguese immigrants from Madeira.  The original name in Portuguese is the “braguinha”.  Aren’t you glad we don’t have to call it that?  The Hawaiians renamed it the ukulele, referring to the “jumping flea” as suggested by the jumping motion of the hands playing the instrument.  It was not introduced in the mainland until 1915, first being featured at the Panama Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco.  Later the ukulele became popular in the U.K, Japan and from there around the world.

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.  – Berthold Auerbach

What do you get when you combine the most unassuming instrument known to man with the most powerful theme song ever???  Well, you get something like this – and it is really pretty good!  Kudos to the Brits!  The theme from “Shaft” performed by the United Kingdom Ukulele Orchestra.

If you own a ukulele, today is the day to play it and share your knowledge with others.  Change the world 4 strings at a time.

If you’d like more information about the ukulele, check out Ukulele Movement’s website.  http://ukulelemovement.com/

 The ukulele is a little bundle of joy that will guarantee happiness!  – Ukulele Movement

I’m a pianist, but have a great deal of respect for those who use their fingers to press on strings.  I tried to play the guitar, but I soon discovered my short fingers did not want to make all the chords and as my fingertips became more calloused, I completely lost interest.  Nobody warned me it would be that painful.  🙂

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NATIONAL NACHOS DAY

TL 11-6 NATIONAL NACHOS DAY

11-6 NACHOS ANYTIME

If we were in Hawaii, we’d order Kalua pork and pineapple nachos.  If we were in Music City, Memphis, Tennessee, the nachos would be barbecue with pulled pork strewn over the top with a ton of cheese sauce poured over them with jalapeño pepper slices.  These yummy chips can be made any way you like, but there is usually one common ingredient – melted cheese!

Ignacio Anaya, a Mexican from the border town of Piedra Negras, accidentally invented nachos in 1943.  Hungry guests showed up at a Victory Club, the restaurant he was working at across the Rio Grande River from Texas.  They were the wives of American soldiers who had shopped in town and needed food.

He improvised with the ingredients he had on hand – tortillas and cheese.  He cut the tortillas into triangles and melted the cheese along with the triangular chips.  He topped the dish with jalapeño peppers – and Voila’ – the first recipe of Nachos was created.

This is from 2009 – but still fun to watch.  I sure could not eat that whole platter of nachos – could you?

Anaya was called Nacho because he was short – so the dish he created was called Nachos.  It grew in popularity in Texas and the Southwest over the next 20 years.  Anaya went on to work at the Moderno Restaurant in Piedras Negras, which still uses the original recipe.  Later he opened his own place, Nacho’s Restaurant in the border town.

Nachos really gained popularity in the 1970’s and 1980’s thanks to Frank Liberto.  He began selling nachos at Arlington Stadium, home of the Texas Rangers.  He created a melted cheese product that was part cheese and part secret ingredients.  His cheese sauce didn’t need to be heated and the shelf life extended well beyond the original recipe, which used perishable cheese.

Nachos were introduced to famous broadcaster Howard Cosell, who put in a plug for the snack during a Monday night football game.  That endorsement helped turn nachos into a household name.  Nachos are now a part of tailgate parties nationwide.

Nachos are a common snack and are fixed in many ways.  Some people like them with just cheese and other’s like them loaded or super.  You can add meat, refried beans and melted shredded cheese.  Cold toppings such as shredded lettuce, tomatoes, salsa, onion and jalapeño are piled on top to make it a sort of mini taco snack.  Add a dollop of sour cream or guacamole to that.  The possibilities are limited only by your imagination.   Some ideas include cilantro, chicken, chorizo, bacon, lime, olives and Pico de Gallo.

Celebrate today – with nachos!  Happy NATIONAL NACHOS DAY!!!  😉

Linda’s Favorite Nacho Recipe:

Ingredients:

1/2 lb. extra-lean ground beef

1/2 lb (8 oz.) Velveeta, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

7 cups tortilla chips (6 oz.)

1 c. shredded lettuce

1/4 c. sliced black olives

1 can (10 oz.) Ro*tel diced tomatoes & green chilies, well-drained

Directions:

 meat in skillet; drain.

 Velveeta in small microwaveable bowl on HIGH 1 min. or until completely melted, stirring after 30 sec.

 chips on large platter; top with Velveeta, meat and remaining ingredients.

Enjoy and have a blessed day!  😀

 

 

PEARL HARBOR DAY

TL 12-7 PEARL HARBOR DAY

AMERICAN FLAG
FREEDOM IS NOT FREE

 

No one deserves more honor and respect from Americans than our Veterans.

Daddy in the 1940's
J.L. Turner – Veteran of WWII

 

My daddy was in the U.S. Navy, a WWII Veteran. He served in the Aleutian Islands. Obviously, as time marches on, fewer of these wonderful WWII Veterans are around to honor. They deserve nothing short of our best.

There’s a very sad and disturbing trend in our country these days. There seems to be no regard for anything that happened in the past. This is a dangerous place to be, for if we do not study the history of our country we will surely make the same mistakes again. We need to take more interest in the past to avoid a very slippery slope in the future.

At 7:48 a.m. on December 7, 1941, 353 Japanese fighter planes bombed U.S. air bases across the Hawaiian island of Oahu. It turned into what Franklin Delano Roosevelt called “a day that will live in infamy.” The attack happened in two waves, which lasted about 90 minutes, and in that time the Japanese succeeded in sinking or damaging 18 ships – including all eight U.S. battleships, which were a symbol of U.S. naval excellence – and destroying or damaging over 350 aircraft. And in less than two hours, the Japanese had killed 2,402 Americans and wounded 1,282 more.

The attack on Pearl Harbor stunned the U.S. Navy, which had been completely unprepared for such an event. Men aboard the U.S. ships being bombed woke up to the shrill sounds of bells and alarms and the famous message sent from the naval headquarters in Hawaii: “Air Raid Pearl Harbor. This is not a drill.”

we never forget. ❤