A COMMENTARY FROM THE HEART

TL A COMMENTARY FROM THE HEART (31)

I got dogged for writing about HALLOWEEN yesterday.  I was called a sympathizer for the devil, uncommitted to Christ and a false witness for God.  Well, say what you will of me – but I was raised in an age of innocence when going door to door saying TRICK-OR-TREAT was a wholesome, albeit calorie laden activity.  I was not raised to have anything to do with darkness, I assure you.  When I was a kid – it was all about the candy, homemade popcorn balls and Mrs. Guffy’s famous Ghostie cookies.  THAT’S ALL it was about.  Now…  can we move on because boy do I have a testimony FOR THE LORD that will give the devil a BIG BLACK EYE!

You know I’m diabetic.  I try not to make a big deal out of it, but I’ve been a type 2 diabetic since 1994.  I’m all too familiar with the dreaded HIGH blood sugar, but hardly have a LOW.  Yesterday, however, I was battling low blood sugar!  Since I’m diabetic, we chose not to buy any Halloween candy because we don’t have that many children in our neighborhood who actually Trick-or-Treat door to door.  They get together and go to the mall.

So I’m thinking, “Oh great!  I could legally have a candy bar – and we don’t have any!”  I try to keep glucose tabs in the house or gel, but I didn’t have either one.  Everything in our house is diabetic-friendly.  We don’t even keep a smidge of sugar here.

I hate low blood sugar – I can’t think straight and I feel as though my insides are just going to fall apart – some of you can relate.  I drank a little buttermilk and ate a piece of bread.  Usually bread or a carbohydrate will raise it up.  It just was not working.

Then I did something really radical…  I PRAYED.  Don’t laugh…  but I asked God for a candy bar.

I want you to know that God can use ANYTHING and ANYONE to provide.  He used the fact that it was Halloween to help me out of a real bind.  There are little girls across the street (we call them our angels).  They occasionally bring nice little gifts to our door – ring the doorbell – and RUN away!  It’s so cute!

I’m not joking – about 2 minutes after I sincerely asked God to help me out – the doorbell rang.  We opened the door, and there was a bucket full of snack-size Milky Way bars.  Attached to the bucket handle was a mylar balloon with a happy face on it!  A sweet card was stuck in the side of the bucket.  Our angels came through!

So…  for those who think my post yesterday was somehow evil – you know what?  You don’t really know me, do you?  Isn’t it amazing in this day of faceless, impersonal cyber communication, we feel we have the right to completely judge a person for sharing a few precious Halloween memories from a bygone era???  Really???  Well, shame on you!

When I was a child – I enjoyed the day, the candy, the popcorn balls and Mrs. Guffy’s famous Ghostie cookies.  I refuse to apologize for the post.  I won’t.  God’s Holy Spirit has not checked me about the choice – and He won’t because He understands the MOTIVE behind what I wrote.  All you see is a kid in a costume.  I see myself and my dad having so much fun with my mom’s make-up and jewelry – trying to look like clowns!  Shame on anyone who would wag their finger at me for sharing childhood innocent fun!

I love the Lord with everything in me.  I intend to serve Him in any capacity I can no matter what circumstances I find myself in.  I wanted to share this special example of GOD’S FAITHFULNESS and HIS PROVISION in my life.  Thank You, Lord!  🙂

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SOUTHERN FOOD HERITAGE DAY

TL 10-11 SOUTHERN FOOD HERITAGE DAY (USED 2014)

10-11 SOUTHERN FRIED YUM

Today is SOUTHERN FOOD HERITAGE DAY!!!

Kansans have an advantage when it comes to food. We take a little dab from Nebraska, add a sprinkle of this from Colorado, mix together with a touch of Oklahoma and shake it up with a bit of Missouri! Mama used to call that “Guess What I Am”. Trust me, you haven’t really lived until you’ve eaten it.

My folks had deep Southern Oklahoma roots. Even though my dad was raised in the city and mama was a farm girl, both grew up appreciating certain foods and styles of cooking. We lived on the cheap when it came to food, especially in the summertime. We raised okra, squash of all kinds, tomatoes, peas, carrots and melons. We went to the market for bread and butter, only because we didn’t have enough acreage to let a milk cow graze or plant our own wheat. There was, however, a wheat field right across the street from us for many years. Us kids used to go out and play in it (I’m sure the farmer appreciated that).

My dad also planted fruit trees in the back yard. We had our own cherries, apples, pears and (my personal favorite) apricots! There is nothing like a fresh apricot right off the tree – mmm! Good stuff, Maynard!

With all this bounty, we enjoyed Southern delicacies such as fried okra, fried green tomatoes (maters), cream peas and honey-glazed carrots. That reminds me – we also raised our own honey bees. My dad kept bees out behind his shed for years!

Sleep ’til you’re hungry, eat ’til you’re sleepy.  – Author Unknown

We had meat at every meal and mama fried it in her electric skillet and covered it with cream gravy. There was a potato, either fried (what a surprise), baked or boiled. We were meat and potato, down to earth, nothin’ fancy ’bout us – folks.

We usually waited a little while to eat dessert, but my favorite was mama’s apricot cobbler! Ah, it was good! When it was al a mode it was even better. We didn’t have artificial sweetener back then – it was sugar, baby! But we ate in moderation and nobody worried about blood glucose. We worked hard back then raising our food – so we got some exercise before eating supper and dessert. Exercise makes a big difference!

Those are precious memories. I’m so thankful to God for putting me with the Turner family. They taught me first hand about God’s wonderful provision. Love you, Mom & Dad! ❤

JOHNNY APPLESEED DAY

TL 9-26 JOHNNY APPLESEED DAY

9-26 PLANTIN' SEEDS

Today is JOHNNY APPLESEED DAY!!!

John Chapman (September 26, 1774 – March 11, 1845) was an American pioneer nurseryman who introduced apple trees to large parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, as well as the northern counties of present day West Virginia. His dream was to produce so many apples that no one would ever go hungry.

Johnny Appleseed is described as a man of medium height, blue eyes, light-brown hair, slender, wiry and alert. Folklore has also described him as “funny looking” because of the way he dressed. It is said he traded apple trees for settler’s cast-off clothing. He was known to give the better clothing to people he felt needed it more than he. This could be why legend says he wore only coffee sacks with holes cut out for his arms as clothing. He rarely wore shoes, even during the cold of winter. It is said he could walk over the ice and snow barefooted and that the skin was so thick on his feet that even a rattlesnake couldn’t bite through it.

Another legend says he wore a mush pot on his head as a hat. This is unlikely since pots of the time were made of heavy copper or iron, but it is more likely he wore someone else’s castoff hat or made his own out of cardboard. He rarely sought shelter in a house, since he preferred to sleep on bare ground in the open forest with his feet to a small fire.

Because he was a kind and generous man, he became an American legend during his lifetime. He was a leader in conservation and placed a great deal of importance on apples. He was a missionary for The New Church (Swedenborgian). Legend has painted him as a sort of dreamy-eyed person who went about just scattering apple seeds. The fact is, he was a very organized, careful business person, who over a period of nearly fifty years, bought and sold tracts of land and developed thousands of productive apple trees.

When Johnny was only eighteen years old, he and his eleven-year-old half-brother, Nathaniel, headed west. In his early twenties, John began traveling alone, which is how he spent the rest of his life. Nathaniel stayed behind to farm with their father, who had immigrated west.

John always carried a leather bag filled with apple seeds he collected from cider mills. According to legend, he was constantly planting them in open places in the forests, along roadways and beside streams. Research, however, suggests he created many nurseries by carefully selecting the perfect planting spot, fencing it in with fallen trees and log, bushes and vines, sowing the seeds and returning at regular intervals to repair the fence, tend the ground and sell the trees. Soon he was known as “the apple seed man” and later he was known only as “Johnny Appleseed”.

He frequently visited the settlements to preach the Gospel of Christ. He was a friend to all the children and made friends with many Indian tribes. He learned many Indian languages well enough to hold a conversation.

Johnny Appleseed never killed animals for food, but lived from other food provided by nature. He appeared to be poor, but was not. He had more cash than he needed by selling his apple trees and tracts of land. He buried his money instead of trusting banks. He bartered and traded food or clothing rather than collect money for his trees. It was more important a settler plant a tree than pay him for it.

In 1842, Johnny made his last trip back to Ohio after spending 50 years walking throughout the countryside. He moved in with Nathaniel, the half-brother with whom he began his remarkable journey. On March 18, 1845, he died of pneumonia at the age of seventy-one. He was visiting his friend, William Worth, in Indiana. Legend says it was the only time he was sick in his whole life. He is buried in an unmarked grave near Fort Wayne, Indiana.

A life well-lived I must say! Love the Lord and He will give you the desires of your heart! He lived a life filled with purpose and loved people! May we all follow his great example! ❤