NATIONAL ROTISSERIE CHICKEN DAY

TL 6-2 NATIONAL ROTISSERIE CHICKEN DAY

EATING CHICKEN

Ugh – liver IS the worst – AMEN to that!  😉

We can hardly imagine a restaurant that does not have rotisserie chicken turning before our eyes!  A rotisserie uses indirect heat in which the chicken is placed next to the heat source.  Elements are either electric or gas-powered, with adjustable infrared heat.  These types of rotisseries are quite functional for cooking rotisserie-style chicken.  It’s perfect for a restaurant that serves so many people every day!

It’s wise in its simplicity really – because any leftover chicken can be used for sandwiches, chicken salad, soup or any number of other dishes.

Here in the states, rotisserie chicken gained popularity in the 2000’s.  Not only did restaurants start offering the dish, but many grocery stores and even Walmart sold them.  Millions of rotisserie-cooked chickens were purchased by consumers in the U.S. last year. 

Protein is a key nutrient that supplies your body with energy and keeps your muscles and cells healthy. Three ounces of rotisserie breast meat supplies 23.8 grams of protein, which is 52 percent of the 46 grams of protein that women need each day and 43 percent of the 56 grams that men require on a daily basis. A rotisserie thigh contains 22.9 grams of protein.  For type 2 diabetics, this is good news!  Just make sure you weigh that piece of chicken so you keep portion control in mind.  😉  And…  in our house the skin is removed – sorry, but that skin is just unnecessary fat.

People who suffer with migraine headaches should be aware that chickens used for rotisserie cooking may be injected with water or a solution of sodium to retain moisture and add flavor.  The water is not bad, but the addition of sodium can trigger migraine headaches.  Some other ingredients may be used to enhance flavor and brown the chicken, such as oleoresin, yeast extract, sodium tripolyphosphate and natural flavorings.  Yeah, some of these additives trigger migraines as well.  Be careful when you’re choosing a chicken.

Since there’s literally no way to tell what has been injected into a rotisserie-cooked chicken, my husband and I decided to buy a Showtime rotisserie for our home.  We put as little or as much seasoning on our chicken as we like.  There’s more than one way to cook a chicken!  It’s just one more way to take control of my surroundings and stay healthy.

https://www.ronco.com/

We usually inject a little water into the chicken and sprinkle some Mrs. Dash seasoning on it before cooking.  The natural juices and no sodium seasoning make the chicken taste amazing – and no ugly migraine side effect – YAY!  So, eat some rotisserie chicken today!  🙂

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BIRTHDAY #55

TL 4-2 BIRTHDAY #55

4-2 PERKS & PITFALLS

Last night I got such a sweet present from Lucinda Berry Hill.  Thank you, my friend!  You’ve made turning the ol’ double nickel so much better!  🙂  I love that basket heart too – don’t you???

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God has blessed me with another year of life!  Today I am the ol’ double nickel…  old enough to receive a senior citizen discount at most restaurants and I could join AARP (but that will never happen because I am not a fan…).  I am a fan of good health, happiness, faith and joy.  I’m thankful for every day God gives me to begin again and do better with His help.

Put on then, as God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved,  compassionate hearts, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience, bearing with one another and,  if one has a complaint against another,  forgiving each other;  as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive.  – Colossians 3:12-13

Of all the things I could pray for, today I ask God to give me more compassion for everyone and everything around me.  I want to be more relatable than ever because it’s what God wants for me.  He wants all of us to be more gentle and kind with one another.  I KNOW I need to have more patience and compassion for those young drivers…  Lord help me with road rage!

Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace.  –  Albert Schweitzer

You are not going to believe this, but shortly after I wrote this post, Lucinda sent me a poem to design.  As I read it – the little blurb about compassion just reached out and slapped me!  I have to share it today.  I love how God guides both of us to write – but it’s especially cool when we’re both directed to write so similarly!  I just got chills when I read this.12571279_1738613263049803_574237969_n

Yes – I will make an effort to bring calmness where I walk, to show kindness and compassion, and pointing all to God.  SEE why I got chills up my spine???  WE LOVE HOW GOD WORKS

Love you, my sister in Christ!  ❤

My husband gave me a a 3.5 qt. Dutch oven.  Of course I’ll be trying it out today.  So, let me share the recipe with you.  Just one more thing…  if you are not a vinegar fan, you may want to add a couple of packets of Splenda or Truvia to this.  It’s got a pretty strong vinegar flavor.  😉

Vinegar-Braised Chicken & Onions (serves 6)

Ingredients:

2 lbs. pearl onions

Kosher salt

3 Tbs. olive oil

8 oz. pancetta (Italian bacon), cut into 1/4″ pieces

4 cloves garlic, peeled & crushed

5 lbs. chicken pieces (I use thighs & legs)

Freshly ground black pepper

3/4 c. balsamic vinegar

3/4 c. red wine vinegar

2 c. low-sodium chicken broth

1/2 c. golden raisins

2 bay leaves

Directions:

  • Cook onions in a large pot of boiling salted water until tender, 5-8 minutes. Drain and let cool. Trim root ends; peel.
  • Meanwhile, heat oil in a large heavy pot over medium heat. Add pancetta to pot and cook, stirring occasionally, until fat is rendered and pancetta is brown, 8-10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer pancetta to a large bowl.
  • Add onions to same pot and cook, stirring occasionally, until beginning to brown, 8-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring often, until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Transfer onions and garlic to bowl with pancetta.
  • Season chicken with salt and pepper. Working in batches, add chicken to pot skin side down and cook, turning, until browned on all sides, 10-15 minutes per batch; transfer to bowl with onions.
  • Carefully drain fat from pot and return to medium-high heat. Add both vinegars to pot and bring to a boil, stirring and scraping up any browned bits from bottom of pot. Add broth, raisins, bay leaves, and reserved chicken, pancetta, onions, and garlic to pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, partially covered, until chicken is fork-tender, 35-40 minutes.
  • Using a slotted spoon, transfer chicken and onions to a large platter. Skim fat from cooking liquid and discard. Remove bay leaves, and season sauce with salt and pepper. Spoon sauce over chicken and onions.

For dessert we will probably have some fresh sliced strawberries with whipped topping.  Sounds like a great birthday dinner to me!  🙂

NATIONAL FIG WEEK

TL NOVEMBER 1-7 IS NATIONAL FIG WEEK

Hello!  It is NATIONAL FIG WEEK!!!  For those of you who think that the only good thing about figs is found in FIG NEWTONS, hold on to your hat, because every day this week I’ll be sharing some of my favorite recipes using this naturally sweet fruit!

When I think of figs, I naturally think of one of my favorite books, The Bell Jar.  Chapter 7 talks about figs:

I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story.  From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked.  One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn’t quite make out.  I saw myself sitting in the crotch of this fig tree, starving to death, just because I couldn’t make up my mind which of the figs I would choose.  I wanted each and every one of them, but choosing one meant losing all the rest, and, as I sat there, unable to decide, the figs began to wrinkle and go black, and, one by one, they plopped to the ground at my feet.  – Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar, Chapter 7

I know we associate autumn with all things orange – pumpkins, cinnamon (okay, that’s brown) – but there are also some purples to consider when doing your holiday cooking and baking.  Here is fig recipe number one:

FIG AND LEMON CHICKEN (serves 6)

INGREDIENTS:

Juice of 1 lemon

1/4 c. Splenda brown sugar

1/4 c. white vinegar

1/4 c. water

1 1/2 lbs. dried figs

1 sliced lemon

12 chicken thighs

salt to taste

1 Tbs. chopped fresh parsley

1 tsp. dried parsley

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

In a small bowl, combine lemon juice, Splenda brown sugar, vinegar and water; set aside.

Place figs and lemon slices in the bottom of an 11 x 16-inch baking dish.  Arrange chicken thighs on top, then pour vinegar mixture over chicken.  Sprinkle with salt and dried parsley.

Bake for 50 minutes, basting frequently.  Turn figs over if they begin to burn.

Remove chicken from baking dish with slotted spoon onto serving platter.  Skim fat from juices and pour over chicken or put in gravy boat.

Garnish chicken with fresh parsley.

Serve and enjoy!

Note:  We always take the skin off our chicken before baking it.  I know…  I know – but it makes it healthier.  The good news is, with this recipe – it doesn’t matter if the skin is on the chicken or not – it’s so delicious you won’t miss the skin.  🙂