NATIONAL MOTH WEEK

TL 7-23 thru 7-31 NATIONAL MOTH WEEKMost of the moths in our part of the country are not as pretty as the photo on today’s banner.  Ours tend to be fuzzy little dark brown critters and nothing as pretty as their cousins the butterflies.  insect-626199_1920

This week we pay homage to the humble little moth, a creature that God made and apparently wanted to save and saw to it that a couple made it to Noah’s ark.  What are the differences between butterflies and moths?  moth-butterfly-differences

http://easyscienceforkids.com/all-about-butterflies-and-moths/

http://nationalmothweek.org/

Moths make up the order Lepidoptera, one of the major groups of insects. There are over 150,000 species of moths!  They live around the world, inhabiting forests, meadows, fields and human houses.  Since they destroy certain fruit and crops, they are classified as pests.  Moths can range in size from smaller than a pencil tip to bigger than a songbird.

Moths are usually active at night and rest during the day in a preferred wooded habitat.

So they aren’t just the drab little brown creatures that hang around our porch light and cling to our screens at night in the summertime.  Who knew?  I didn’t know there were folks out there interested in raising them.

The beautiful Luna moth does not have a mouth — so cannot eat — and will live only for about one week, with the singular purpose of mating!  There’s a small group of moths called “bird dropping” moths.  Yep – it’s because that’s what they look like when they are at rest.

Here’s a resource for anyone who wants to know more about moths.  It was written with the beginner in mind and is easy to understand.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/peterson-field-guide-to-moths-of-northeastern-north-america-david-beadle/1104512944

Did you know that moths like beer?  The Nature Conservancy writes, “Nothing attracts these guys like beer.  A tip from our scientists:  Mix a paste of beer, brown sugar and banana.  Paint it on some trees, kick back and relax, then check back in the evening with your flashlight to see the multitude of moths you’re sure to attract.”

 The next time you are outside and see the moths gathered by your porch light or clinging to your screen door, think about some of the fun facts you’ve learned here.  🙂

 

 

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